When does Bill 132 take effect?

 

August 29, 2005

 

What is a ‘pit bull’?

 

For the purpose of Bill 132, the law defines ‘pit bull’ as a pit bull terrier, a Staffordshire Terrier, an American Pit Bull Terrier, or a dog that has an appearance and physical characteristics that are similar to those dogs.

 

What is a ‘restricted dog’?

 

If you own the dog that falls into the category described above and you owned that dog prior to August 29 2005 or if your dog is born in Ontario before November 27 2005, you own a ‘restricted’ dog’ Restricted dogs are permitted in Ontario if they are muzzled, leashed and sterilized.

 

What is a ‘prohibited dog’

 

If you own a dog that falls into the category described above and it was born in Ontario after November 27 2005 or brought into Ontario after August 29, your dog is prohibited dog and may be subject to confiscation, destruction or both. Only a pound or research facility may own a prohibited dog in Ontario.

 

What happens if I am convicted under the new law?

 

If you own a restricted dog and are convicted of any offence under the law, your dog must be destroyed. Regardless of your dog’s breed if you are convicted of any offence under the new law, you may be fined up to $10,000 and you may receive a sentence up to 6 months in jail. A corporation may be fined up to $60,000.

 

How does the new law affect all dog owners?

 

Court proceedings may be initiated against the owner of any dog: if the dog has bitten or attacked ; if the dog has behaved in a manner that poses a menace to the safety of persons or domestic animals ; if the owner did not exercise reasonable precautions to prevent the dog from biting, attacking or posing a menace to the safety of persons or domestic animals; or if an existing order has been breached.

 

The court may order the destruction of the dog (mandatory for offending dogs identified as ‘pit bulls’) sterilization of the dog (mandatory for all offending dogs) control measures including muzzling, leashing, confinement, wearing signs and /or prohibition of dog ownership.

 

This information was obtained from the Attorney General’s web site. Please see the link www.attorneygeneral.jus.gov.on.ca

 

Dog Legislation Council of Canada

 

www.doglegislationcouncilcanada.org

 

The Dog Legislation Council of Canada (DLCC) was formed in 2003, is a not-for-profit group counting among its members experienced, ethical and responsible dog enthusiasts nationwide.

 

The DLCC is Canada’s first and most unique collaborative efforts of rescue volunteers, veterinarians, owners, dog trainers, breeders and handlers to promote responsible ownership of all dogs.

 

The objectives of the council are two fold:

 

The first is the promotion and support of responsible dog ownership. This includes child dog safety programs, bite free programs for adults working in proximity of dogs (police, post office) and working with dog owners one on one.

 

The second objective is to encourage and foster the implementation of non-breed specific dangerous dog by-laws. Non-breed specific dangerous dog by-laws designate dogs as ‘dangerous’ based on behaviour rather than breed. These by-laws allow for more efficient animal control, without pointlessly punishing responsible dog owners. They address concerns over dog aggression and recognize the role of human negligence behind most incidents. We believe that this provides greater flexibility for municipalities to address negligent dog owners while not penalizing responsible owners for their personal choice in breed. The DLCC supports the implementation and enforcement of zero-tolerance dog licensing, zero-tolerance leash laws, and heavy fines for non-compliance. We support financial, and in some cases criminal, repercussions for those owners whose dogs, when not in compliance with existing laws, cause injury to a human being or to another animal. It is time irresponsible dog owners faced real consequences. For far too long, a person whose dog(s) mauls someone is subject to insignificant penalties, such as a fine or an order to confine or destroy them. We believe in significant repercussions, both financial and criminal, to dog owners who, in the opinion of a judge, could reasonably forsee the occurrence of an injury based on the previous behaviour or previous multiple infractions of existing laws. We suggest the implementation of the thirty-six recommendations from the inquest into the 1998 death of eight-year-old Courtney Trempe of Stouffville, Ontario. We suggest the province implement the recommendations from the inquest into the 2003 death of four-year-old James Waddell of New Brunswick. We suggest that, as soon as possible, the province implement the recommendations from the ‘Community Approach to Dog Bite Prevention’ report by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Task Force on Canine Aggression. You also may not be aware that breed-specific legislation has been rejected by every major dog organization in North America, most of which have boards and memberships filled with people whose lives have been dedicated to understanding dog behaviour, have publicly stated that they do NOT support breed-specific legislation and that they do NOT believe that it works.

 

What is a Breed Ban?

 

Breed bans or Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) is when legislators, either municipal or provincial, enact laws governing what breed of dog their citizens can choose to own.

 

Within those laws, a designation of ‘dangerous’, ‘vicious’ or ‘prohibited’ dog is automatically applied to any dog of the deemed breed whether it is purebred or a mix. Or if it appears to have all the physical characteristics of that breed, it is so deemed by legislators.

 

If you own one such breed, type or mix, it will mean that you will likely have 3 options.

  1. Give up your beloved pet, regardless of the fact that s/he has likely done nothing to warrant this designation.

or

  1. Keep your pet muzzled and leashed whenever in public or off your own property, including at training classes, veterinary offices and other dog sport activity classes such as flyball or agility.

and / or

  1. Maintain a home owners’ insurance policy with a $100,000 up to $1,000,000 liability coverage for your dog, microchip, spay/neuter, muzzle him or her anytime they are outside (even on your own property), build a secured kennel complete with a roof and bottom and padlock, as well as post notice of a ‘dangerous’ dog living on your property.

 

Is this fair? OF COURSE NOT!!

 

Be a responsible owner every day and get involved in stopping BSL, both in your community and across Canada! Join the DLCC in helping enact solid, enforceable dangerous dog by-laws that are not breed specific!

 

Almost every known animal related organization is against enacting Breed Specific Legislation because they know it is not the breed of dog that is the problem… IT IS THE OWNER!

 

HELPFUL HINTS TO REMEMBER AS PARENTS AND TEACH YOUR CHILD

 

Family Dog

 

NEVER disturb a dog who is sleeping, eating, or caring for puppies.

 

NEVER pet a dog, even your own, without letting him see and sniff you first.

 

Dog WITH the Owner

 

Children must always ASK PERMISSION from the owner and their parents BEFORE petting any dog.

 

If the owner CANNOT control the dog and have it SIT nicely for the child to pet, SAY THANK YOU AND WALK AWAY.

 

Dogs in their own yard NEVER approach a dog who is confined behind a fence, within a car, or on a chain.

 

NEVER TEASE any dog by poking at them through fences or car windows or reaching your arm through to pet them.

 

Dogs WITHOUT an owner

 

NEVER approach a dog you don’t know or a dog who is alone without his owner.

 

NEVER RUN away from any dog that is chasing you. STOP, STAND STILL, REMAIN CALM WITH YOUR ARMS AT YOUR SIDES. DO NOT SCREAM, AND WALK AWAY SLOWLY FACING THE DOG BUT NOT STARING AT THEM.

 

If a dog attacks, ‘feed’ him your jacket, purse, bicycle, or anything else that you can get between you and the dog.

 

If you are attacked, STOP, CURL UP IN A BALL LIKE A TURTLE, COVER YOUR HEAD WITH YOUR ARMS AND HANDS

 

LINKS

www.bannedaid.com

www.ckc.ca